This is a very big week for me.  On Wednesday I’m interviewing for a teaching job in Indonesia, on Friday my father’s coming down to help me get my double citizenship for Belize. And I’m trying to finish a cover album for bandcamp by this weekend.  My granny’s health is real bad though and its taking its toll on me.  I’m the only in the family who is really here for her and its a weird feeling to know that she could die any minute and I’m the one who is most likely to witness it. Alone. 

The realization of long held dreams to travel the world and finally feeling some progress after such a long musical dry spell happening at such a painful time.

The only way out of darkness is light. That is the rule. I won’t let go of it.  I’m trying really hard not to let go of it. 

Someday you will find me

fuckyeah1990s:

How To Have Cybersex On The Internet

ethiopienne:

how do you bring a black child into a world that plots their destruction before they leave the womb? how do you explain to a black child that their life is a crime, that they will be hated for existing? how do you weight your own love heavily enough to stand up to every force that tells a black child they are unlovable by definition? how do you bring a black child into this world?

maarnayeri:

Let us be vividly clear about this.

What the New York Times did to Michael Brown today was not merely slander. It wasn’t a case of a lack of journalistic integrity.

Highlighting that a black teenager was “no angel” on the day he is being laid to rest after being hunted and killed by racist vigilante forces is not an unfortunate coincidence.

The New York Times deliberately played into an archaic American tradition in devaluing both the merit of black life and the tragedy of black death.

They chose the day of his funeral, as his family, friends and activists everywhere have to grapple with a human being lost to pontificate about how he was “no angel”. Michael Brown was many things to many people; a son, a brother, a cousin, a nephew and another black causality of murderous police institutions and today, amidst all the racist violence he, his loved ones and community have had to endure, he was going to finally receive the respect and moment of honor he deserved and NYT decided today, of all days, to tune in their audience onto wholly irrelevant facts about his life - that in turn, transform the very injustice surrounding his death and the following police violence that plagued Ferguson into a national panel about whether or not his death is actually worth mourning and their language suggested that to them, it indeed is not.

This was hardly an accident or mistake. This is the perpetual hostility that is met against black life in America. The consensus is that black people deserve no respect and for black life to be legitimized and honored, we must meet a list of prerequisites. Subsequently, if black people aren’t valued, neither are our deaths understood as tragic or murders seen as criminal action.

This has been the atmosphere of America since its inception and much has not improved.

elective-affinities:

Cooling Off Beside Fountain At Philadelphia Museum Of Art, August 1973 - Dick Swanson

radicalbehavior:

Tell me about a time where a white child was killed and black people made a hashtag mocking their death, a Halloween costume mocking their death, or a celebration of their death in any way shape or from. NEVER!!

Black pride has never been about hating white people, but white supremacy has always been about hating black people.